What do we Learn From a Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign in a Developing Country? A Cross-sectional Study Breast Cancer Campaign

Bita Eslami (1), Sahar Rostami (2), Kazem Zendehdel (3), Sadaf Alipour (4), Ramesh Omranipour (5), Azin Nahvijou (6)
(1) Breast Cancer Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran, Islamic Republic of,
(2) Cancer Research Center, Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran, Islamic Republic of,
(3) Cancer Research Center, Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran, Islamic Republic of,
(4) Breast Diseases Research Center (BDRC), Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran, Islamic Republic of,
(5) Breast Diseases Research Center (BDRC), Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran, Islamic Republic of,
(6) Cancer Research Center, Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran, Islamic Republic of

Abstract

Background: Breast cancer (BC) screening and awareness programs are held annually for Iranian women by the collaboration of several governmental and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) organizations. We designed a study to assess the effect of the campaign on women's awareness, education, and the outcome of previously unnoticed breast lesions detected during the campaign screening program.


Methods: Through online social media announcements, women were invited to participate in this campaign held in five locations in the capital of Iran. Participants filled a questionnaire about personal data, previous breast problems, BC awareness and screening attitudes. BC screening was only performed via breast examination by surgeons for all women. We called all participants who required further investigation after two years.


Results: In this campaign, 418 women with a mean age of 43.19±49.11 were examined. About 42% had some information about BC, mainly acquired from the media. Among women over 50, 30.2% had no previous screenings, and 15.9% had not been referred despite having symptoms. Among the women who needed further investigations according to the campaign evaluation, 71.8% complied with the recommendation to follow-up their case, and two women were diagnosed with BC.


Conclusion: Women need more education in the field of BC awareness, and the need for screening; especially after the age of 50. To achieve these goals, using mass media is highly recommended and the experience of the successful campaigns held by a Charity organization and an academic center might be a good guide for preparing a comprehensive protocol.

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Authors

Bita Eslami
dr.bes.96@gmail.com (Primary Contact)
Sahar Rostami
Kazem Zendehdel
Sadaf Alipour
Ramesh Omranipour
Azin Nahvijou
Author Biographies

Sahar Rostami, Cancer Research Center, Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Kazem Zendehdel, Cancer Research Center, Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Cancer Biology Research Center, Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Iran

Breast Diseases Research Center (BDRC), Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Sadaf Alipour, Breast Diseases Research Center (BDRC), Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Department of Surgery, Arash Women's Hospital, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Iran

Ramesh Omranipour, Breast Diseases Research Center (BDRC), Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Department of Surgical Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tehran University Medical of Sciences, Iran

1.
Eslami B, Rostami S, Zendehdel K, Alipour S, Omranipour R, Nahvijou A. What do we Learn From a Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign in a Developing Country? A Cross-sectional Study: Breast Cancer Campaign. Arch Breast Cancer [Internet]. 2023 Oct. 31 [cited 2024 Apr. 14];10(4):347-53. Available from: https://archbreastcancer.com/index.php/abc/article/view/768

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