Contralateral Breast Diffuse Large B Cell Malignant Lymphoma With Previous MALT Lymphoma

Main Article Content

Ali Assarian
Amirpasha Ebarhimi

Keywords

Contralateral Breast Lymphoma, Breast Cancer, Breast Diffuse B Cell Lymphoma, Breast MALT lymphoma

Abstract

Background: Breast involvement during malignant lymphomas is a rare condition, whether in primary or secondary cases, whereas according to the literature, primary breast lymphomas represents merely less than 0.5% of the breast malignancies.
Case Presentation: The case was a 48 years-old patient referred to the clinic with contralateral breast diffuse large B cell malignant lymphoma. She had an operation for right breast mucosa-associated lymphoma tissue (MALT) lymphoma two-years earlier. The participant experienced surgical excision of the right breast mass and radiotherapy subsequently. Surprisingly, after two years she developed a mass on the left breast, for which we were not able to establish an evident relationship between the earlier MALT lymphoma and the second diffused B cell lymphoma.
Conclusion: Although, our report emphasizes on the undeniable role of the breast examination in prevention of catastrophic events, we are far from providing diagnostic approaches on breast MALT lymphoma, due to minimal case sizes and lack of adequate information and evidences.

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